What 24 hours in your parents' home can teach you

THE ALZHEIMER'S GEMBA IS YOUR PARENTS' HOME

Go see, ask why, show respect
— Fujio Cho

Can Alzheimer’s really be as big a deal as people say?

After all, my parents and I talk on the phone every week, and Mom seems fine.  Sure, the last few weeks she handed the phone to Dad and walked away. But Mom’s always had her moods.  And sure, Dad does interrupt our conversations to tell Mom to put down the banana.  But I probably should have called at a better time of day.

When a Loved One is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s life changes for every person in the family.

Acceptance comes in waves, with the hush of denial in between.

Let’s say you are a family member who wants to support your Loved One and Caregiver through Alzheimer’s.  There is a technique you can use to speed up your acceptance.  The same technique helps you clearly see the new lives that your Loved One and Caregiver now live.

Here it is: Spend twenty-four hours in your parent’s home.

 Photo by Henri Picot via Unsplash

Photo by Henri Picot via Unsplash

While you’re there, pay attention to the items listed below. Can you see differences between your parents ten years ago, and your parents today?  Notice each of your parents in the morning, afternoon, and evening.  Remember: this is a fact-finding mission.  The temptation is to jump into immediate improvement mode. Do your best to simply observe. Only when the visit is complete, and you review what you learned, are you ready to identify possibilities that may improve each of your parent’s new realities. 

The good news is that even though there is yet to be a cure for Alzheimer’s, there are many ways to improve life for your Loved Ones with Alzheimer’s and your Caregivers. What’s important is that improvement possibilities address what is needed today, and when possible anticipate what may be needed in the next six to twelve months. This requires effort.  Observe the following.

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24 hrs AFTERNOON.PNG
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Twenty-four hours at your parent’s home will give you a fresh perspective on how Alzheimer’s has already changed their lives.  It will speed up your acceptance of the new realities of their lives and yours. And, twenty-four hours will help you identify things in your parent’s lives that you can explore with them as things they may consider improving.

Given all that you learn, this exercise may be the best return you will ever get on an investment of twenty-four-hours.  Plan now for a return visit in six to twelve months to see what has changed and what that can teach you.

Your friend on the journey,

Barbara

 

RELATED ARTICLES FOR ALZHEIMER'S KIDS

 

WHO'S DOSING WHO? - Alzheimer's, your parents and their medicine  Read

LUNCH WITH JACK & MRS. SPRATT -  Alzheimer's, your parents and their diet Read

INDEPENDENT LIVING AND YOUR LOVED ONE - When is it time for a change?  Alzheimer's, your parents and their safety  Read

 

Independent Living and your Loved One: When is it time for a change?

ALZHEIMER'S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR SAFETY


Freedom and independence.  These values are in the DNA of Americans. Maybe that is why it is such a heavy moment when an Alzheimer’s Kid realizes they may need to curtail the independence of an Alzheimer’s Loved One.


Emotional moments like these are when having an objective system to support decision making can be most valuable. An objective system allows family members to make decisions even when emotions are at their wildest.


If only there was a list of things that people who live independently must be able to do. A list that could take some of the emotion and conjecture out of the risk / benefit exercise that comes with the question of whether to continue to support independent living for the Alzheimer’s Loved One.   A list that would identify what the Alzheimer’s Loved One is objectively able to do.

A list like this might assess a Loved One's capacity to perform independent living activities like:

  • Housework
  • Meal preparation
  • Taking medications as prescribed
  • Managing money
  • Shopping for groceries & clothing
  • Using the telephone
  • Managing transportation
  • Doing Laundry

The good news is that in 1969 M.P. Lawton & E.M. Brody created a list for just this purpose. Their “Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale” (IADL) is used by professionals to identify what a person is capable of doing today, and to identify changes in that ability over time.


Since the IADL Scale is a trusted tool for health care professionals -  it certainly is appropriate for Alzheimer's Kids weighing a Loved One's independence on one hand, and their health and safety on the other.

This year Mom might have the skills and support she needs to continue her independent life.  Next year may be different.  When the decision is final that other-than-independence is right for Mom, the next thing to consider is what her new arrangement might look like. The right choice depends on Mom's need for support today and in the future, the availability of family members to participate in supporting Mom, and available financial resources.

Choices for new living options include:

  • In-home professional caregivers
  • 24x7 in-home professional caregivers
  • Family member who moves in with Mom and helps
  • Mom moves in with family member
  • Mom moves in to Assisted Living or Memory Care

This is a season of change for you and your Mom.  It may be one of the first instances where you have to step in and make life choices to keep her safe and healthy. This is a big step, so balance kindness toward yourself with empathy for your Mom.  Recognize that she needs someone to provide safety and care for her, whether she can say it or appreciate it at the time.

You can make it through this!

Your friend on the journey,

Barbara

An Alzheimer's Love Letter I wish I had sent to my Dad

If I’d have known then what I know now, I'd have sent this Alzheimer's Love Letter to my Dad.

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Dear Dad,

Thank you for sharing the news that Mom has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. This means that today Mom is the best she will ever be. We should enjoy every moment we have together.
We also need to prepare for what is ahead.

While Alzheimer’s is different in each person, there are common patterns that families with a Loved One with Alzheimer’s share.

Since we would all like Mom to live at home as long as possible, it means that every member of the family will need to lend a hand in Mom’s care. And we will need a lot of outside help too.

The scariest thing I’ve heard is that Alzheimer’s Caregivers usually pass before their Loved One with the disease. The strain of caregiving coupled with normal aging is significant. Given your excellent health today, I agree this sounds unlikely to happen to us.  Yet I’ve heard from adult children who’ve seen their parents go through it. They say that Alzheimer’s care-needs are like an avalanche leaving the Caregiver buried at the bottom.

Research shows that whatever the caregiver’s plan is at the beginning, at some point during Alzheimer’s, an adult daughter or daughter-in-law shoulders some caregiving duties. I know you plan to care for Mom to the end by yourself.  What I’m saying is that since adult children often end up providing care, I want you to keep me in the loop from the start.

Please share Mom’s behaviors as they change.  Keep me in the loop as you take on new chores.  Different from hearing it as complaining, I promise to hear it as an honest barometer of the progress of Mom’s Alzheimer’s.

Let’s start with little steps.  I need to have complete medical histories for you and Mom, and the names and addresses of your doctors.  I need you to sign HIPPA releases allowing me access to your medical records.

Something else I’ve learned.  This is a biggie.  I’ve been advised that since I live two-hours from you, it’s going to be easy for me to be in denial about Mom’s condition. Apparently, the less I see Mom, the less in-tune I’ll be with the progression of her disease.  It will be very easy for me to imagine that the disease is yet to progress.  Especially if I hear very little from you.
Help me make career and life choices for the next decade with complete and current information about you and Mom.

This carries a real risk. If I’m in denial, I may do something counterproductive.  I may take on a work role that requires more time in the office, or more travel time away from you.  I may say yes to an overseas assignment. Each and every one of these times, I need to remember that in the decade to come, I’ll appreciate every aspect of my life that makes me available to you. My flexible schedule. Money in the bank. My work benefits.

Consider the alternative. I could wait for a crisis, then jump in with both feet.  At that point my learning curve will be so steep it will be like the anvil that falls on Wyle E. Coyote’s head in the old Road Runner cartoons.  I’ll be laying on the ground, with stars and bird spinning over my head just when you are most ready to accept my help.

There is one goal we can both aim for.  If you and I do this right, you can survive Mom’s Alzheimer’s.   That’s what I want. I hope it’s what you want too.

Can you support me in these?

Other big picture things we need to address:

  • Updating your wills
  • Putting a Health-care Power of Attorney in place for you both
  • Reviewing your Long-Term-Care Insurance coverage

Next week, we can start talking about you two living closer to me.

I love you Dad,


Barbara

What your caregiver really wants from you

ALZHEIMERS, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR WISH-LIST


Dad has learned to cook. He’s learned to charm Mom into clean clothes. He’s learned to do laundry.  Here are 11 budget-friendly gifts for your Alzheimer’s Caregiver Dad that will wrap him in love on Father’s Day, or every day. After all, who deserves your love more?

 "...a generous serving of love makes every gift better." - Barbara Ivey

"...a generous serving of love makes every gift better." - Barbara Ivey

Brighten His Day

Life as a Caregiver means that your Dad is caring for your Alzheimer’s Loved one around the clock.  Along with preparing food and providing a safe home, Dad is the household source of love, laughter and joy. That means that Dad needs to be filled with joy enough for two. Here are some reasonably priced gift ideas that Dad and Mom can both enjoy together.

1.       A card – sweet, funny, or musical

2.       Recent photos, printed and mailed

3.       Old photos, printed and mailed

4.       A spare phone charger

Make Every Day Easier

Caregivers are on-the-job twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. They take on household duties more and more as the Alzheimer’s Loved One becomes less able to remember the sequence of steps.  So a gift that makes a Caregiver’s day easier is always a great idea.

5.       Pre-prepared meals

6.       Sign Dad up for online grocery ordering, so he can pick up at the drive-through. 

7.       Clean laundry / laundry service

8.       A simplified wardrobe for Mom.   Having only this season’s clothes in the closet, helps her dress appropriately for the season.

9.       A clean, orderly living space that is safe for Mom

Visit

Before you visit, talk with your Dad to identify a convenient time to arrive. Your Alzheimer’s Loved One has good times of day, and better times of day. Remember that your Caregiver Dad needs a hug and a friendly face as much (or more) than your Alzheimer’s Loved One

10.   Try 2 by 2 visits.  Visit in pairs. This way, one visitor can talk, listen and laugh with the Caregiver while the other does the same with the Alzheimer’s Loved One.

When did your Caregiver last have a few minutes on their own?   The answer may surprise you. Getting a haircut used to be simple, fun errand.  So was getting the oil changed. Now, your Mom may come along on these errands (and others) because it is safer for her than staying home alone. Give your Caregiver Dad the gift of a free hour, an afternoon, or longer by caring for your Loved One yourself. Plus, you will learn a lot by walking in his shoes.

     11. Take a turn caring for your Mom

Whether you live near or far, whatever your budget, there are many priceless gift options you can give to your Caregiver Father that really will make life easier for him as he cares for your Mom.  And remember - a generous serving of love makes every gift better!

Finding your best during Caregiving

I found Denise Brown and her Caregiving.com community in the fall of 2017.  It was more than three years since my Mom had passed from Alzheimer’s. Sometimes I still needed reassurance that the ways my life had changed were normal. I had read a bit about the National Caregiving Conference and decided to tune in to the Livestream to see what value it might have for us Alzheimer’s Kids. 

The presenters and panelists I saw were all positive survivors. They made me feel accepted. They made me feel normal. I realized I had found my tribe.

This year I’m thrilled to be a presenter myself at that same event.

Recently, NCC18 host Denise Brown led a Virtual Caregiving Summit to give Caregivers a taste of what they can expect at the conference. Denise invited Stephanie Antoine, Karen Laing and me for a late-afternoon virtual cup-of-tea and a chat about finding our best during Caregiving.  Here it is for you to enjoy.

If this was helpful, I invite you to watch the other 2018 Virtual Caregiving Conference videos. All of the interviews are with real Caregivers like you.  Their varied perspectives are likely to resonate with you, and may even spark some fresh ways of thinking.  Watch all the 2018 Virtual Caregiving Conference videos here. 

Mark your calendar for November 9-10, 2018. The Third Annual National Caregiving Conference (NCC18) will be held on those days at the Chicago Marriott O’Hare in Chicago Illinois.  Family caregivers and former family caregivers will share their experiences, insights and solutions. The great news is that the conference is available to both those who can travel to Chicago and those who benefit from attending via Livestream.  The preliminary agenda for the Third Annual National Caregiving Conference can be found here.

 I’ll be presenting Curiosity and Learning: Evidence you are doing a good job caregiving.  Often, Caregiving is a life-long vocation. I’ll be encouraging healthy Caregivers to measure success by what they learn.  I’ll introduce proven Lean Process Improvement principles and tools to make this a simple and rewarding practice. Join me on the COPING track on Saturday, November 10, 2018

I encourage you to check out Caregiving.com. I love the fresh perspectives of those caring for Loved Ones in varying conditions; and the reminder that Caregiver needs are the same even when our Loved One’s diagnosis is different. Caregiving.com was founded by Denise Brown in 1996 to help and support family caregivers.  Caregiving.com is a community of supportive individuals caring for a family member or friend. This community cares for parents, spouses, siblings, grandparents and anyone we consider family. Caregiving.com cares for you before, during and after caregiving.  http://www.caregiving.com

Your Friend on the Journey,


Barbara

 

Barbara Ivey to present at Third Annual National Caregiving Conference

Curiosity and Learning: Evidence you are doing a good job caregiving

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Fort Mill, SC

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The Third Annual National Caregiving Conference (NCC18) takes place on November 9-10, 2018 in Chicago Illinois.  The agenda features family caregivers and former family caregivers sharing their experiences, insights and solutions.

The conference is available to those available to travel to Chicago as well as those who benefit from attending via Livestream.  Pre-conference training programs and workshops will be held Thursday, November 8th, and a day of service will be held on Sunday November 11th.

Barbara Ivey will present Curiosity and Learning: Evidence you are doing a good job caregiving.  Often, Caregiving is a life-long vocation. Barbara encourages healthy Caregivers to measure success by what they learn.  In this session, Barbara introduces proven Lean Process Improvement principles and tools to make this a simple and rewarding practice. Ivey’s presentation is part of the Coping track on Saturday, November 10, 2018

The preliminary agenda for the Third Annual National Caregiving Conference can be found at https://www.caregiving.com/ncc18/agenda/

Caregiving.com was founded by Denise Brown in 1996 to help and support family caregivers.  Caregiving.com is a community of supportive individuals caring for a family member or friend. We care for parents, spouses, siblings, grandparents and anyone we consider family. We care for you before, during and after caregiving.  http://www.caregiving.com

Barbara Ivey (@alzbarbie) writes THE PERFECT THING blog for people with a parent diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and a parent who is their Caregiver.  Barbara’s belief is that Caregivers-to-Caregivers experience Alzheimer’s differently from their Caregiver.  This means they need different resources during and following their journey.  Barbara is dedicated to sharing those resources – those Alzheimer’s life-preservers – because she believes they might actually help save the lives of Alzheimer’s Kids. Based in Fort Mill, SC, Barbara Ivey is the author of Patterns in Time® and Patterns at Hand, which were both published in 2017.

Contact Author

Barbara Ivey

The Perfect Thing LLC

+1 704-877-9283

 

 

Alzheimer’s-friendly holidays

ALZHEIMER'S, YOUR PARENTS AND HOLIDAYS


Radio personality Francene Marie hosts this power-chat with me and Katherine Lambert.

Gobs of tips for happier holidays with Loved Ones living with Alzheimer’s.

(Link to recording is below the photo.)

 L to R, Katherine Lambert, CEO Western NC Alzheimer's Association, Barbara Ivey, Author and Alzheimer's Kid, Francene Marie, Radio Personality

L to R, Katherine Lambert, CEO Western NC Alzheimer's Association, Barbara Ivey, Author and Alzheimer's Kid, Francene Marie, Radio Personality

Patterns in Time wins Gold 2017 MarCom Award

Visual Guide to One Family’s Alzheimer’s Journey

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Fort Mill, SC - Revised: October 14, 2017

MarCom Awards, one of the largest, most-respected creative competitions in the world, announced the 2017 winners on October 12, 2017.  Patterns in Time®, published by The Perfect Thing LLC of Fort Mill, SC wins gold in the print publication category.  Each year about 6,000 print and digital entries are submitted from dozens of countries.  

Judges of the MarCom Awards are industry professionals who look for the brightest, most radical and revolutionary creatives rocking the marketing and communication industry.  Recognition goes to those who communicate boldly and brilliantly through planning, design and writing.

"At The Perfect Thing LLC, our goal is to publish Alzheimer’s resources with visual stories that are easy for busy people to remember," says Barbara Ivey, The Perfect Thing Chief Marketing Officer. "Creative design is key. We are grateful to be among the 2017 winners, and for the recognition for Patterns in Time®.”

A full list of winners from the MarCom Awards can be found at http://www.marcomawards.com.

MarCom Awards honors excellence in marketing and communication while recognizing the creativity, hard work and generosity of industry professionals.  Since its inception in 2004, MarCom has evolved into one of the largest, most-respected creative competitions in the world. https://marcomawards.com/

The Perfect Thing LLC is an independent publisher of visual and heartfelt titles for families getting through Alzheimer's.  The Perfect Thing LLC is headquartered in Fort Mill, SC. http://www.theperfectthing.info

Barbara Ivey (@alzbarbie) writes for Alzheimer’s Kids and Caregivers and is based in Fort Mill, SC. Barbara Ivey is the author/copywriter of Patterns in Time®

BO Haynes (@bohaynes) is an artist based in Charlotte, NC.  BO Haynes is the illustrator and designer of Patterns in Time®

Colson Printing of Valdosta, GA is a full-service printing and graphic arts company. Learn more at: http://www.colsonprinting.com.

Contact Author

Barbara Ivey

The Perfect Thing LLC

+1 704-877-9283

2017 MARCOM Gold Winner small.jpg

BO Haynes Wins Gold MarCom Award for Patterns in Time

Visual Guide to One Family’s Alzheimer’s Journey

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Fort Mill, SC - Revised: October 14, 2017

MarCom Awards, one of the largest, most-respected creative competitions in the world, announced the 2017 winners on October 12, 2017.  BO Haynes was recognized as a Gold Award winner as illustrator and designer in the printed publication category of out of over 5,000 entries from around the world. 

Judges of the MarCom Awards are industry professionals who look for the brightest, most radical and revolutionary creatives rocking the marketing and communication industry.  Recognition goes to those who communicate boldly and brilliantly through planning, design and writing.

“The Perfect Thing is grateful to be recognized for our creative superstars,” says Barbara Ivey, Chief Marketing Officer of The Perfect Thing . “Our goal is to publish Alzheimer’s resources with visual stories that are easy for busy people to remember. Creative design is key. BO Haynes breathed life into this story, and we congratulation him on the MarCom recognition."

A full list of winners from the MarCom Awards can be found at http://www.marcomawards.com.

MarCom Awards honors excellence in marketing and communication while recognizing the creativity, hard work and generosity of industry professionals.  Since its inception in 2004, MarCom has evolved into one of the largest, most-respected creative competitions in the world. https://marcomawards.com/

The Perfect Thing LLC is an independent publisher of visual and heartfelt titles for families getting through Alzheimer's.  The Perfect Thing LLC is headquartered in Fort Mill, SC. http://www.theperfectthing.info

BO Haynes (@bohaynes) is an artist based in Charlotte, NC.  BO Haynes is the illustrator and designer of Patterns in Time®

Barbara Ivey (@alzbarbie) writes for Alzheimer’s Kids and Caregivers and is based in Fort Mill, SC. Barbara Ivey is the author/copywriter of Patterns in Time®

Colson Printing of Valdosta, GA is a full-service printing and graphic arts company. Learn more at: http://www.colsonprinting.com.

Contact Author

Barbara Ivey

The Perfect Thing LLC

+1 704-877-9283

 

2017 MARCOM Gold Winner small.jpg

Yes - Professional Women and Men Need Alzheimer's Support Groups!

ALZHEIMER'S, YOU AND YOUR SUPPORT


Recently, I had the honor of meeting two fine people who each had been an Alzheimer’s Caregiver to a Loved One. The woman had cared for her husband through Alzheimer’s; the man cared for his wife through Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). Their stories, their bravery, and their strength reminded me of the sturdy threads of love that link together all Caregiving efforts.

These lovely Caregivers gave me a special gift that day: a special moment of being understood.  A moment where I could share my experiences as an adult child of someone with Alzheimer's (I call myself an 'Alzheimer’s Kid').  A moment when each one of us could nod in agreement that - yes - we had indeed all lived through many similar experiences.

It left me wondering..."Is this what it feels like to be part of a support group?"

You see, somehow, I stumbled through my Mom’s entire Alzheimer’s journey without ever knowing that all family members benefit from participating in an Alzheimer’s Support Group. 

So today, I’m extending the invitation to you.  If you are a Caregiver, or a Caregiver-to-the-Caregiver - call your local chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association (or your local Hospice or your local Assisted Living Facility) and ask for the time and location of an Alzheimer’s Support Group near you. Support Group acceptance helps you be more accepting with your Alzheimer's Loved One.  Is there a better gift can you give your Loved One than that?

As you look forward to your first meeting, re-read the stories below, and look forward to being part of a community of people who ‘get’ where you are and what you are living through.

Alzheimer’s Kids Can Join Support Groups Too


Support Dad with his support group
 

~Peace,

Barbara

 

Handle your Caregiver with Care

ALZHEIMER'S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR STRESS


We’ve all been there. That moment you strike up a conversation, and the other person seems to explode in anger all over you. Maybe it’s their boss, or their spouse, or the guy that just cut them off in traffic. Whatever fired them up is history.  The present is that you showed up in time for the explosion.  Usually, once it’s over, there’s a moment between the two of you.  A shrug acknowledging the mutual understanding that you were the undeserving recipient of emotions triggered by someone or something else.

During my Mom’s Alzheimer’s, I stumbled into this situation again and again.  As my Mom’s Caregiver, Dad wisely refrained from unloading his frustration, his worry, his sadness or his stress onto Mom or onto his friends.  So the first person to call (often me) to innocently check in - perhaps to ask if he had found the time to visit the Adult Day Program - would be rewarded with the explosion. When I hung up I’d be numb. And also full of questions.  What the heck just happened?  What did I do to deserve that?  What is so terrible about visiting the Adult Day Program that it would make Dad respond like this?

In hindsight I see these calls were versions of the old familiar experience. Except, with one difference.  In the Alzheimer’s setting, the satisfactory moment of mutual understanding has yet to ever come.

This week I have been poring over the results of a very recent survey conducted by the Alzheimer’s Association. Survey results are as mouth-watering as dark chocolate to a lifelong researcher like me.  Hungrily, I dug into this study, conducted on-line this April 2017. Among the respondents were 252 people who had previously given care to someone with Alzheimer’s and 250 people currently giving care to someone with Alzheimer’s.

In the survey respondents were asked to put into words their feelings about caregiving. The mixed bag of emotions they identified has given me new insight into the emotional explosions I used to get from Dad on our calls. 

Current and former Caregivers reported a complex blend of emotions.  On the one hand, they report that caregiving made them feel helpful, productive, strong, supported, confident.  On the other, they report that caregiving made them feel worried, sad, stressed / overwhelmed.  43% report they frequently feel guilty.

 Caregiving brings a range of emotions.  Always handle your Caregiver with extra care.

Caregiving brings a range of emotions.  Always handle your Caregiver with extra care.


So now, let’s revisit my phone call to Dad, where I ask if he has found an opportunity to visit the Adult Day Program, and try to imagine what emotions my questions triggered in him.

Maybe the thought of this visit made Dad feel sad.  Maybe he had convinced himself that Mom would always be too sharp to fit in with the others at the Adult Day program. Maybe Dad was feeling under-appreciated for all the things he has done to care for Mom already this week.. Maybe Dad felt overwhelmed by the list of household chores waiting for him today.

Stir together the emotions of sadness, under-appreciation and overwhelm, and you get a powder keg. And right then, on cue, the phone rings…and it is me.

One small, life-changing thing you can do, is to hold a picture in your mind of your Caregiver beside a “Handle with Care” sign. This way you always remember the emotions brewing in the Caregiver on the other end of the phone, and treat your Caregiver with care.

Peace,


Barbara

 

Review results of the “Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month 2017, Alzheimer’s Association Survey” here.

Patterns

I am programmed for pattern recognition. Something happens more than once, and I notice. I used to believe that everyone is like this. As I live longer, I understand that this is part of my secret sauce - a special gift that God entrusted to me.

My gift of pattern recognition may explain why the experience of my mother's Alzheimer's and my father's Caregiving is such a compelling story for me to tell. 

During our Alzheimer's journey, curious things would happened once. Then they would spin in my mind in a holding pattern, waiting for a second occurrence.

Emotions veil much. Only now, in sharing the stories from a place - just beyond the urgency of the daily Alzheimer's walk - am I finally able to recognize patterns from the journey that my emotions of the moment had concealed.

Two patterns I have recognized flavor everything I write.

  1. Alzheimer's is a family disease because it impacts everyone in the family. 
  2. Alzheimer's Caregivers and Alzheimer's Caregiver Kids need to be wrapped in love during their Loved One's Alzheimer's journey.

Today, I am proud to share two new collections of patterns I have recognized on this journey.   My prayer - my dream - is that these find their way into the hands of Alzheimer's Caregivers, adult children of parents with Alzheimer's in their household (Alzheimer's Kids) and Caregiver Kids.  That these titles achieve my publishing goal of providing the ideal blend of information, support and compassion for families on an Alzheimer's journey.

Patterns in Time    

Patterns at Hand

Patterns in Time™ and Patterns at Hand are exclusively available online from the www.ThePerfectThing.info store. 

By publishing and selling these titles independently, I can offer beautiful, custom titles written, illustrated and printed in the United States.
 

AND OF COURSE,


Your purchase helps me continue volunteering to find a cure for Alzheimer's through The CART Fund. #ImCuringAlz #CARTFUND

*For your protection, this website is hosted by Squarespace and secure credit card processing is done through Stripe.  Read more about this in our Purchase Terms & Conditions.


The online store is open. I proudly invite you to shop our first editions today! 

Your Friend on the Journey,

 

Barbara