Surviving Alzheimer Together – The #1 Cure for Sibling Joy & Peace

 

Siblings are the easiest people in the world to resent.

“You always were Mom’s favorite.”

“Dad’s never bought ME a car.”

“You’ve been living off Mom and Dad for years.”

Sadly, the older we get, the deeper resentment can grow.

 

A parent’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis adds strain to every sibling relationship.

“I’m helping out at Mom & Dad’s every day.”

“I’ve funded their mortgage for years.”

“I manage all their bills and checkbooks.”

My life experience has taught me the value of using Alzheimer’s as the opportunity to improve cooperation and communication among you and your siblings.  You see, Alzheimer’s is a make-or-break family experience. Get through Alzheimer’s with a ‘me vs. you guys’ mindset and the divisive wedge of sibling resentment is pounded deeper. (Think decades of likely future estrangement.) Get through Alzheimer’s by prioritizing working together and you will lighten parents’ load plus you’ll enjoy at least 7 kinds of support and peace from your siblings. Take these for example:

1. A sibling is your first responder.

Who does the care partner call when Mom refuses to dress? Or when she burns a pot on the stove or needs a ride to the doctor?  Usually a sibling or family member, often the one who lives nearest, serves as the family’s first responder.  It’s common for siblings and their partners to assume they are aware of all the times the local family member is dispatched. In truth they only hear about the five alarm fires. Like fire-fighters who hand out carbon monoxide and smoke detectors, first-responder siblings triage hundreds of safety situations that go unmentioned. They assess situations like: who is best to drive to today’s doctor appointment? Who actually ate lunch? And when were the sheets were last changed? Show appreciation and respect to your first responder. The recognition you give them will strengthen your relationship and provide the extra dose of joy they need to bear up under first-responder stress.

To understand how siblings contribute to caregiving while living at a distance, read: Are You a Caregiver? Why it matters for you to know .

2. A sibling is an eyewitness to your past.

“Memory…is the diary we all carry about with us.” Oscar Wilde

What would it be like to see someone change right before your very eyes? With Alzheimer’s, a person can look the same on the outside while inside they are transforming into a completely different person . A coffee-addicts quits cold turkey; an introvert becomes an extrovert; a minister begins to swear freely; a peaceful person becomes violent.

There will be times when you will want to remember your Mom the way she was when she raised you. Surviving Alzheimer’s together with your siblings connects you with others who are experts on your Mom. Even memories of the most imperfect mother, and the way she was, will bring you joy and peace when shared with your siblings.

3. A sibling is a comfort to you in your grief.

“… [Mom’s] personality has changed ever so much, and it is a process of change for me as a daughter. And unlike other illnesses, that change means loss - a lot of the time - and loss means grief. So, if I’m looking at it in the negative way, it’s a lot of grief over and over and over again, which is the hard part of this.” Sarah Mitchell, daughter of Wendy Mitchell, NY Times Best Selling Author of “Someone I Used to Know” on BBC Sounds podcast, April 2, 2019  

Alzheimer’s is a subtraction disease. It takes small parts of our loved-one away bit by bit. As Mom’s abilities, hobbies and preferences diminish Mom eventually gets better at accepting the change. We on the other hand seem to get worse. Maybe it’s because we are the ones who need to adapt to her losses. We long for the good old days when Mom weeded the flower garden with Old-Testament vengeance and ruled the house with a wooden spoon. We miss our Mom. We grieve the loss of the house-blend that made Mom so uniquely Mom. Because we are human, we grieve. Grief over Mom’s losses is normal. Grief will continue for as long as Mom lives with Alzheimer’s (and likely beyond). Sharing your grief with siblings can offer peace and solace for all of you.

4. A sibling can give you a firm reality check.

“Doctor, my eyes/ Tell me what you see. / I hear their cries. Just say if it’s too late for me.” – Jackson Browne

During Alzheimer’s your loved one is guaranteed to say or do things you find unbelievable. Next thing you know their care-partner will join in doing it too. What’s on earth is going on?

Changes in the Alzheimer’s brain are changing their reality. The good news is that often their ‘unusual’ behavior can be a sign that they are appropriately adapting to their new realities.

Now take a look at yourself in the mirror. How are you adapting to these changes? Somehow by standing still, you’re now the one out of step.

A great way to find peace in these moments is to talk them over with a sibling. In this case your sibling (even one on the opposite end of the political spectrum) may be the only one who can give you the reality check you really need. They can confirm that yes, in fact, this is a new behavior (rather than something you missed seeing all these years).  And reassure you that yes you can (and must) pay closer attention to your parents than you have been.

5. A sibling can help you know when to stop fixing and start accepting.

“If there's a single lesson that life teaches us, it's that wishing doesn't make it so.” ― Lev Grossman.

After your reality check, a natural response is to try to fix everything. To de-clutter the house. To organize the medications, to move Mom and Dad somewhere safer, and on, and on. These can be sound impulses, especially when put in place in concert with your siblings.

There will come a day when all the busyness and change become the problem. Your care partner is too frazzled to put your plans into action. Your loved one is less able than you realize. Alzheimer’s is at least 3 steps ahead of you.

This is when a sibling can give you the wake up call you need. A sibling can help you realize that the only positive way forward is to work on your own acceptance. To accept that your fixes are agitating and frightening for your loved one. That your fixes are exhausting for your carer. This is the time when you need to accept that entering your loved ones’ new world is the perfect gift to give them.

6. A sibling relationship creates opportunities to be merciful.

“The quality of mercy is not strain’d,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.”

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare, Act 4, Scene 1 

When your sibling deserves anger, punishment, or retribution and you choose not to give them what they deserve, you are exercising mercy.  Mercy is a gift to you both. Mercy is a gift you will feel great giving, because it will free you from your resentment. And it’s a gift that feels great to receive because it is an undeserved surprise and also reminds us to return the gift of mercy.

7. A sibling is a travel companion on the long Alzheimer’s road.

“When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.”
- Robert Fulghum

True, even when your sister has cooties.

CONCLUSION

Siblings can be compassionate support resources for parents  – (and for each other) during Alzheimer’s.

Sustaining each other brings you, your siblings and your care partner safely over the Alzheimer’s finish line. The healthier, stronger connections gained are a gift that helps us better appreciate the imperfect people we love.

RECOMMENDATION

Every effort you make to get you and your siblings on the same page during a loved one’s Alzheimer’s is valuable. Many siblings navigate the relationship and well-being changes related to Alzheimer’s on their own. Other siblings find it helpful to have a neutral third-party facilitate discussion and learning. They find a third-party gets them on the same page at a faster rate with stronger, lasting results.

The Perfect Thing now offers a solution for these siblings. Siblings Surviving Alzheimer’s brings siblings together to learn about Alzheimer’s and its impact on families. Sessions provide answers to your hows and whys, include facilitated discussions to strengthen sibling respect, collaboration and connection. This is your opportunity to work directly with Barbara Ivey, an expert who has been in your shoes.

Sessions are available on evenings and weekends. Online meetings make it possible for siblings who live in different towns or time zones to participate easily. Perfect for the closest of families or families who are physically or emotionally distant. For more details, and to book your first appointment, see Siblings Surviving Alzheimer’s.

Are you a Caregiver? Why it matters for you to know

It took me fourteen-years and nine-months to figure out that I was a caregiver. One hurdle was the terminology. To me, the word “caregiver” described my Dad. During Mom’s Alzheimer’s, Dad cared for Mom 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. Using “caregiver’ to describe what I did, well, it just felt wrong. How could the encouragement, love and resources I gave to Dad, measure up to the laundry, meals and baths Dad gave to Mom?

Fourteen-years and nine-months later, I’ve finally accepted that the same word is used to for both Dad’s role and my role. [i] I’ve also realized something more important.

Caregiving is something other than a competition.

What matters in caregiving is 1) that you care and 2) that you give care.

WHY IT MATTERS FOR YOU TO CALL YOURSELF A CAREGIVER

Alzheimer’s caregiving catches almost everyone by surprise. We quickly realize that there is a lot to learn. And that everyone involved has a different perspective about what is best for your loved one with Alzheimer’s.

One thing is for sure. Something happens when you embrace the title of Alzheimer’s caregiver. Doors begin to open. You notice things you’ve yet to notice before. Announcements for events, advertisements for support groups, and registrations for caregiver classes. They seem to almost jump out and call your name. This is because your brain now sees these as pertaining to you. You type ‘Alzheimer’s family caregiver’ or ‘family caregiver support [state]’ into BING, and your odds of finding relevant resources improve dramatically.

Even more doors open when you attend events for ‘Alzheimer’s Caregivers’ in person.  Doors to resources that help with the emotions of Alzheimer’s caregiving. Doors to services you can test out to see if they might help.  Doors to resources that provide breaks from caregiving.

Whether these sound valuable today is of little consequence. They will be valuable someday.

WHEN ONLY A SPOUSE OR LEGAL GUARDIAN WILL DO

Of course, there are situations when only the caregiver who is the legal spouse or guardian will do. In healthcare decisions, durable power of attorney decisions, matters around guardianship of property, financial matters and others. Your attorney and advisors will alert you.

WHEN ANY CAREGIVER WILL DO

Know this: In over fifteen years of my mother’s Alzheimer’s, the occasions that required Mom’s spouse or legal guardian totaled up to a maximum of maybe 36 hours.

Every other minute of every day, if Mom could have defined what she needed in a caregiver, it would have been something like this:

Wanted: A well-rested, patient, alert, informed, cheerful person-to-treat-me-with-love.

Remember:

Everything you do to be this person counts as caregiving.

Everything you do to help the primary caregiver be this person counts as caregiving.

DRAW YOUR CURRENT STATE

To prove to yourself once and for all that you are a caregiver, try drawing a picture of your life right now.  This your current state. Get detailed. Get messy. Have fun.

Put your drawing aside for a day or two. The next time you pick it up, imagine someone else drew it. Try to see the drawing with fresh eyes. From what you see, would you say you are looking at the life of a caregiver?

If your answer is yes, start thinking of yourself as an Alzheimer’s Caregiver now. Someday you’ll agree it made all the difference.


Related Articles:

What your caregiver really wants from you

https://www.theperfectthing.info/2018/05/30/2017-5-31-what-you-caregiver-really-wants-from-you/

Phone support for an Alzheimer’s caregiver parent (Plus/Delta Review) https://www.theperfectthing.info/2018/07/26/phone-support-for-an-alzheimers-caregiver-parent-plus-delta-review/

What 24 hours in your parents’ home can teach you

https://www.theperfectthing.info/2018/07/05/2018-7-5-what-24-hours-in-your-parents-home-can-teach-you/


[i] Denise Brown identifies six different stages of caregiving. Learn about each in Denise’s book: The Caregiving Years, Six Stages to a Meaningful Journey. Available at: https://www.caregiving.com/store/#!/The-Caregiving-Years-Six-Stages-to-a-Meaningful-Journey/p/110722781/category=29969901 and on https://www.caregiving.com

An Alzheimer’s Love Letter I wish I had sent to my Dad

If I’d have known then what I know now, I’d have sent this Alzheimer’s Love Letter to my Dad.

 

Dear Dad,

Thank you for sharing the news that Mom has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. This means that today Mom is the best she will ever be. We should enjoy every moment we have together.
We also need to prepare for what is ahead.

While Alzheimer’s is different in each person, there are common patterns that families with a Loved One with Alzheimer’s share.

Since we would all like Mom to live at home as long as possible, it means that every member of the family will need to lend a hand in Mom’s care. And we will need a lot of outside help too.

The scariest thing I’ve heard is that Alzheimer’s Caregivers usually pass before their Loved One with the disease. The strain of caregiving coupled with normal aging is significant. Given your excellent health today, I agree this sounds unlikely to happen to us.  Yet I’ve heard from adult children who’ve seen their parents go through it. They say that Alzheimer’s care-needs are like an avalanche leaving the Caregiver buried at the bottom.

Research shows that whatever the caregiver’s plan is at the beginning, at some point during Alzheimer’s, an adult daughter or daughter-in-law shoulders some caregiving duties. I know you plan to care for Mom to the end by yourself.  What I’m saying is that since adult children often end up providing care, I want you to keep me in the loop from the start.

Please share Mom’s behaviors as they change.  Keep me in the loop as you take on new chores.  Different from hearing it as complaining, I promise to hear it as an honest barometer of the progress of Mom’s Alzheimer’s.

Let’s start with little steps.  I need to have complete medical histories for you and Mom, and the names and addresses of your doctors.  I need you to sign HIPPA releases allowing me access to your medical records.

Something else I’ve learned.  This is a biggie.  I’ve been advised that since I live two-hours from you, it’s going to be easy for me to be in denial about Mom’s condition. Apparently, the less I see Mom, the less in-tune I’ll be with the progression of her disease.  It will be very easy for me to imagine that the disease is yet to progress.  Especially if I hear very little from you.
Help me make career and life choices for the next decade with complete and current information about you and Mom.

This carries a real risk. If I’m in denial, I may do something counterproductive.  I may take on a work role that requires more time in the office, or more travel time away from you.  I may say yes to an overseas assignment. Each and every one of these times, I need to remember that in the decade to come, I’ll appreciate every aspect of my life that makes me available to you. My flexible schedule. Money in the bank. My work benefits.

Consider the alternative. I could wait for a crisis, then jump in with both feet.  At that point my learning curve will be so steep it will be like the anvil that falls on Wyle E. Coyote’s head in the old Road Runner cartoons.  I’ll be laying on the ground, with stars and bird spinning over my head just when you are most ready to accept my help.

There is one goal we can both aim for.  If you and I do this right, you can survive Mom’s Alzheimer’s.   That’s what I want. I hope it’s what you want too.

Can you support me in these?

Other big picture things we need to address:

  • Updating your wills
  • Putting a Health-care Power of Attorney in place for you both
  • Reviewing your Long-Term-Care Insurance coverage

Next week, we can start talking about you two living closer to me.

I love you Dad,

Barbara

Yes – Professional Women and Men Need Alzheimer’s Support Groups!

ALZHEIMER’S, YOU AND YOUR SUPPORT


Recently, I had the honor of meeting two fine people who each had been an Alzheimer’s Caregiver to a Loved One. The woman had cared for her husband through Alzheimer’s; the man cared for his wife through Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). Their stories, their bravery, and their strength reminded me of the sturdy threads of love that link together all Caregiving efforts.

These lovely Caregivers gave me a special gift that day: a special moment of being understood.  A moment where I could share my experiences as an adult child of someone with Alzheimer’s (I call myself an ‘Alzheimer’s Kid’).  A moment when each one of us could nod in agreement that – yes – we had indeed all lived through many similar experiences.

It left me wondering…”Is this what it feels like to be part of a support group?”

You see, somehow, I stumbled through my Mom’s entire Alzheimer’s journey without ever knowing that all family members benefit from participating in an Alzheimer’s Support Group. 

So today, I’m extending the invitation to you.  If you are a Caregiver, or a Caregiver-to-the-Caregiver – call your local chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association (or your local Hospice or your local Assisted Living Facility) and ask for the time and location of an Alzheimer’s Support Group near you. Support Group acceptance helps you be more accepting with your Alzheimer’s Loved One.  Is there a better gift can you give your Loved One than that?

As you look forward to your first meeting, re-read the stories below, and look forward to being part of a community of people who ‘get’ where you are and what you are living through.

Alzheimer’s Kids Can Join Support Groups Too

Support Dad with his support group
 

~Peace,

Barbara

 

Accepting an Alzheimer’s-friendly holiday

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND NEW REALITIES


Will Dad ever concede? 

These days Dad is a sapling in an ice storm, twig-thin and stooped under his burdens.  Meanwhile, Alzheimer’s has appropriated Mom’s remaining joys.  

For five grueling days at Thanksgiving, Mom’s adult day program closes for the holidays.  On our call,  Dad sounds close to surrender.

To clear his head, Dad takes Mom for a walk in the backyard.  Mom trips, falls and sprains her knee.   The strain of loading a confused and hurting Mom into the car, coaxing her through a medical exam, and pleading with her to wear the knee brace is like a garden hose to the face.

Dad begins Mom’s application to a Memory Unit.  

A true romantic, Dad schedules Mom’s admission for January 15th, imagining a final family Christmas.  The dream passes quickly, and Dad awakens to the truth:  This Christmas is unique from all Christmases past.

Mom, to her credit, has done everything she can to help us see what suits her Christmas celebration best, given her advancing Alzheimer’s.  Mom wants to be home. Mom prefers quiet.  Mom’s is calmest in her routine.

After so many years of resistance, Dad surrenders.  We plan Christmas around what is best for Mom.   Dad decides they will stay at their home, in NC.  House guests being more than either can manage, Dad confides that my company, in small doses only, would be welcome.  Randy and I tally our hotel points and book a room nearby.      

Dad insists that the grandchildren enjoy Christmas at their own house ninety miles away.  My sister Diane invites my husband’s parents to join them.

And like that, the Acceptance Christmas plans are settled.

Up the mountain in NC with my parents, we take a fresh approach to Christmas. Dad, Randy and I calibrate all Christmas activities to Mom.  Christmas eve at home.  A duet of carols, my part with words, Mom’s part a hum.

It is a very merry Christmas.  Calm and bright. 

Hobbies change due to Alzheimer’s

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR HOBBIES


“How about I turn on the television for you while Dad and I make dinner?” I ask Mom.  “Maybe there’s a talk show on.”

“No good,” Dad says, poking his head into the sunroom.  “Turn on her music.”

I come to Mom’s defense.  “Come on, Dad. Mom really likes TV. Just this once.”

“Not lately.  Push play on the boom box.”

The intro to “Danny Boy” lilts from the speakers.  Mom’s smile beams. Humming along, she reaches down for her yarn and crochet needle to resume work on another granny square.

I watch in a bit of disbelief. “Dad, when did this happen?”

“Just recently,” he tells me. “Whenever I turn on the TV, she gets up and walks out of the room.  Music makes her happy now.  Just look.”

Mom is rocking back and forth in time to the music, laughing out loud to the song’s lyrical jokes.

In that moment, I pause and say a silent prayer of thanks for the gentle reminder that, even on my best day, I am merely the “Assistant to the Caregiver.” Indeed, the name of this long-running show is Caregiver Knows Best.

Who knows, if I’m smart and persistent, maybe one day I will be promoted to “Advisor to the Caregiver.” But until that day comes, Dad will truly be the resident expert on Mom.

Have you caught yourself stepping in to fill an Alzheimer’s Caregiver role that rightfully belongs to someone else?  Pretty easy to do, right?  How was it received?  If you were in the Caregiver’s shoes, how would you feel?

 

Medication Management: Who’s Dosing Who?

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR MEDICINE


“Chris, can you get down our vitamins?,” Dad directs Mom after breakfast.

I take a step toward Mom. “Let me help,” I offer.

“No, no. That’s your mother’s job.  Right, Chris?”

“Yep,” says Mom.

“That’s right. Every day after breakfast and lunch, your Mom gets down the basket with the vitamins.  While I do the dishes, she puts her vitamins in this cup and mine in that cup.”

“And what about Mom’s medications?”

“She does those, too,” declares Dad, with obvious pride in his orderly division of responsibilities.

We move on to other topics. But on the drive home later, something is nagging at me.

How can Mom still be managing her own medications? And Dad’s, too? During a recent dinner in her favorite restaurant, I had to go searching for Mom after an unexpectedly long trip to the Ladies’ Room, and found her wandering out the front door into the parking lot. And a couple days ago, I learned that someone in Mom’s choir has to help her follow the liturgy in the hymnal. 

This mounting body of evidence does not suggest someone who should be in charge of her own medications, much less those of her Caregiver-In-Chief.

How am I going to have this conversation with Dad?  How do I show him what things look like through my eyes?  How do I help him see how Mom is changing?  How his own life is changing?

Since Alzheimer’s affects each person differently, changes in the Alzheimer’s Loved One can elude even the most dedicated Caregiver.  And guess whose job it will be to step up and bring them to the attention of your Alzheimer’s Caregiver?

Now is the time to prepare yourself for this.  If your family is the “friendly small-talk” type, how can you initiate some shifts that allow you to begin freely discussing important matters?  Give Crucial Conversations a read; the skills you learn from this classic book will come in handy in many ways along your Alzheimer’s journey.

RELATED ARTICLES FOR ALZHEIMER’S KIDS

ALZHEIMER’S GEMBA : What 24 hours in your parent’s home can teach you   Read

Walkin’ After Midnight

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND WANDERING


“Can I help you find something?” my husband Randy asks Mom as she comes out of our guest room and starts down the dark hall.

The clock on the wall reads 12:14 AM. Mom shuffles on straight ahead.

Randy rises from the couch and calls again to Mom across the kitchen. “Chris? Do you need something?”

Mom continues on her way.

Randy dashes through the living room to intercept her. He meets her at the front door.

Mom’s eyes are wide, frightened, lost.  She tries the doorknob.

“Chris, your room is this way,” Randy says, gently redirecting her back toward the guest room. And back she goes.

The next morning, we query Dad about Mom’s wandering. His response?  Mom has yet to ever wander.  So we present last night’s evidence to Dad: Dad’s sound sleep; Randy’s eyewitness testimony; Mom testing the door knob.  But the facts fall on deaf ears. Dad dismisses the evidence as circumstantial.

Case dismissed.

Sophocles wrote in Antigone, “No one loves the messenger who brings bad news.” This is as true today as it was then. 

How are you managing your role as the bearer of unwelcome news?  For Alzheimer’s Kids who are also people-pleasers (like me), this can require triple measures of effort.  What effect is this role having on your relationship with the Alzheimer’s Caregiver in your life?

Alzheimer’s and dental health – Dad looks for the root cause

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR DENTAL HEALTH


“Your Mom is definitely going to need two new crowns. And we’ll need to scrape her gums again in a month or so.” I am here today, at Dad’s request, to get answers to the questions he has yet to be able to ask Mom’s dentist.

“What’s causing Mom to need so much recurring dental work?” I ask.

“It’s the plaque,” the Dentist says.

“Plaque?  What plaque?”

“See?” he says, showing me Mom’s gums. “Due to poor brushing.”

Dad goes pale for a moment.  As a genuine, grade-A, dental hygiene advocate, Dad brushes his teeth three or four times a day.  And he tells Mom to brush her teeth three or four times a day too.  He even bought her an electric toothbrush and a timer to help her keep brushing long enough for all her teeth to be clean.

A prior conversation with the doctor at MemoryCare comes to mind. Dad had voiced concern that Mom had yet to help him clean the bathroom sink anymore. 

“Dad, remember the Memory Care Doctor said Mom probably forgets what she’s doing in the middle of the chore?  Mom wants to help…it’s remembering the steps and the sequence of the steps that’s the challenge.   Could it be the same thing with brushing her teeth?”

Dad is silent.  In time, I say out loud what we’re both thinking:

“From now on, Mom is going to need you to keep her focused while she brushes.”

Dad sums it up. “So now I am a tooth-brushing monitor.”

Have you thought about the impact on your Alzheimer’s Caregiver of becoming a hands-on care provider? What would it be like to get involved with a mate’s “activities of daily living” like brushing teeth?  Has your Alzheimer’s Caregiver shared any stories with you of moving from helpmate role to caretaker role?  Consider ways you can help your Caregiver cross a milestone like this, and move forward with acceptance.  Is there a space for joy and humor in it all?

Support Dad with his support group

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR HEALTH


“This retired Pastor in my group…” Dad begins, with tears in his eyes. “This Pastor says that over his career, he advised hundreds of people how to handle loved ones with memory loss.  Now he’s caring for his wife who has Alzheimer’s.  And he says that now, for the first time, now that it is his wife, he really sees it.  He really sees what Alzheimer’s asks from a Caregiver.”

Six months before, Dad still was yet to be a “Support Group” kind of person.  But today, stories from his fellow Caregivers are the fuel that keep him going.

I find that I am so grateful Dad has connected with others – people whom he respects and who are walking the Alzheimer’s Caregiver journey alongside him.

I smile with my realization:  try as I might, there is only so much that I can be and do for my Dad.

Does your Alzheimer’s Caregiver have someone who truly understands their daily life?  Encourage them to ask their friends if they know of an Alzheimer’s Support Group nearby.  Make some inquiries into someone who can stay with your Alzheimer’s Loved One during the meeting so that your Caregiver can attend focused and carefree. Consider if there is a way that you can help them attend even just once.  After all, one meeting may be enough to convince your Alzheimer’s Caregiver to attend regularly. This could be a game changer for everyone involved.