When Your Parent Won’t Ask for Help

Occasionally, your dementia-caregiver Dad needs a hand.

He always resists asking for it.

Here’s a research-based approach you can use to 1) recruit support for Dad, and 2) follow up to let helpers know they made a difference.

Man driving open convertible with 2 dog
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

Why Dad feels vulnerable asking for help

In her book Reinforcements, researcher Heidi Grant finds that we help others because we see ourselves as helpful. When we ask for help (and when we ask the right way) people say yes for their own reasons.
One thing stands in the way. Asking for help means taking a risk.

When Dad says he’s avoid asking for help because it’s easier to do things himself, he’s right.

The “I’ll do it myself” approach helps Dad avoid something called social pain. What Dad is yet to realize is that there are risks that come with a lone wolf approach to Alzheimer’s caregiving, both physical and emotional.

Imagine what a great gift you’d be giving if you stepped in and managed support for him.

How to get the help Dad needs

1. Make Explicit, direct requests for help

2. Be Reasonable

You are likely to find a helper to bring a hot meal on a specific night.

You are less likely to find a helper to bring a hot meal every Thursday night.

3. Take what you get

Maybe your potential helper is available at a different time of day, another week, or alternate month. Perhaps they are better at visiting with your loved-one than preparing meals. Listen. Consider if you can accept what helpers offer.

4. Respect your potential helpers. Know the reasons helpers help.

  • They help because it’s who they are
  • They help because they choose to help
  • They’ve been there
  • They’re there right now
  • They feel the same way

ALWAYS Let the helper know their help was effective

Helpers are most satisfied when they know their help was effective. You make this happen when you communicate with those who helped through thank you texts / emails / calls or snail-mailed notes.

  • Let the helper know the test they drove Mom to was successfully completed on time, and why that was important.
  • Let the helper know how comforting it was to Dad to have a hot meal waiting after a long day at the hospital.
  • Let the helper know that the get-well card campaign she started has lifted your parents’ spirits day after day.

 

To learn to effectively overcome social pain in order to ask for support, read:
Halvorson, H. G. (2018). Reinforcements: How to get people to help you. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press.