Finding your best during Caregiving

I found Denise Brown and her Caregiving.com community in the fall of 2017.  It was more than three years since my Mom had passed from Alzheimer’s. Sometimes I still needed reassurance that the ways my life had changed were normal. I had read a bit about the National Caregiving Conference and decided to tune in to the Livestream to see what value it might have for us Alzheimer’s Kids. 

The presenters and panelists I saw were all positive survivors. They made me feel accepted. They made me feel normal. I realized I had found my tribe.

This year I’m thrilled to be a presenter myself at that same event.

Recently, NCC18 host Denise Brown led a Virtual Caregiving Summit to give Caregivers a taste of what they can expect at the conference. Denise invited Stephanie Antoine, Karen Laing and me for a late-afternoon virtual cup-of-tea and a chat about finding our best during Caregiving.  Here it is for you to enjoy.

If this was helpful, I invite you to watch the other 2018 Virtual Caregiving Conference videos. All of the interviews are with real Caregivers like you.  Their varied perspectives are likely to resonate with you, and may even spark some fresh ways of thinking.  Watch all the 2018 Virtual Caregiving Conference videos here. 

Mark your calendar for November 9-10, 2018. The Third Annual National Caregiving Conference (NCC18) will be held on those days at the Chicago Marriott O’Hare in Chicago Illinois.  Family caregivers and former family caregivers will share their experiences, insights and solutions. The great news is that the conference is available to both those who can travel to Chicago and those who benefit from attending via Livestream.  The preliminary agenda for the Third Annual National Caregiving Conference can be found here.

 I’ll be presenting Curiosity and Learning: Evidence you are doing a good job caregiving.  Often, Caregiving is a life-long vocation. I’ll be encouraging healthy Caregivers to measure success by what they learn.  I’ll introduce proven Lean Process Improvement principles and tools to make this a simple and rewarding practice. Join me on the COPING track on Saturday, November 10, 2018

I encourage you to check out Caregiving.com. I love the fresh perspectives of those caring for Loved Ones in varying conditions; and the reminder that Caregiver needs are the same even when our Loved One’s diagnosis is different. Caregiving.com was founded by Denise Brown in 1996 to help and support family caregivers.  Caregiving.com is a community of supportive individuals caring for a family member or friend. This community cares for parents, spouses, siblings, grandparents and anyone we consider family. Caregiving.com cares for you before, during and after caregiving.  http://www.caregiving.com

Your Friend on the Journey,

Barbara

 

Can clothing choices can impact a Loved One’s health?

ALZHEIMER’S, YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR CLOTHES


Mom walks out of my guest room dressed for Christmas Eve service.  She’s wearing a big smile.  And her favorite red summer dress.  It’s 30 degrees outside.

“Who made this wardrobe choice?” I wonder.  Dad says that Mom chose the dress herself. 

During the service, the church heat kicks on, and the temperature rises to beach conditions. As I fan myself, the congregation stands for prayer.  Suddenly, Mom leans on me.  Heavily.  Then she crumples. Mom? Mom! What is happening?  My heart stops.

As I panic a young man from the congregation rushes over to help.  He’s a paramedic he tells me, and before I know it, he revives Mom.  Mom is perspiring heavily, so the paramedic and I each take an arm and walk her into the narthex.  Together we help Mom out of the linen jacket of her dress.  I search for something else that I can to remove to cool her off.  Then I see the insulated undershirt I gave her four years ago.  Mom is wearing it under her summer dress.  I guess this wardrobe choice was Mom’s, too.

It occurs to me that my Dad has yet to ever dress a woman for Christmas Eve church service.  Even if he had, he is impervious to weather –  cold, heat, rain, snow it is all the same to him..  I remember Dad getting in the car for church when I was a child.  Snow a foot high. Me shivering in the back seat, watching my breath.  Dad wearing just his Sunday suit.  I wonder, does Dad even know that women have different summer and winter wardrobes?  Can he tell the difference between a summer dress and a winter dress?  Has he ever heard of “layering”?

Before bed, I consider what I can do to help.  Maybe I just need to rotate Mom’s clothes twice a year like I do mine.  I can make sure that her closet only has clothes that fit, are in good condition and are the right weight for the season.  This way, whoever makes the wardrobe choices, chances are good Mom will be wearing something seasonally appropriate.

What wardrobe or fashion challenges has your Alzheimer’s Caregiver experienced with your Alzheimer’s Loved One?  What suggestions do you have for helping Alzheimer’s Caregivers make appropriate clothing choices?